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Art - Architecture - Decoration - Fashion - Photography
ymutate:

Hilma af Klint (1862–1944) was a Swedish artist and mystic whose paintings were amongst the first abstract art. She belonged to a group called ‘The Five’ and the paintings or diagrams were a visual representation of complex philosophical ideas.
 source: but does it float

ymutate:

Hilma af Klint (1862–1944) was a Swedish artist and mystic whose paintings were amongst the first abstract art. She belonged to a group called ‘The Five’ and the paintings or diagrams were a visual representation of complex philosophical ideas.

source: but does it float

(via thegiftsoflife)

euphues:


Renzo Piano, Richard Rogers. Centre Pompidou, facade elevation [competition entry 1971]

17:56// Remember to believe in yourself. 

euphues:

Renzo Piano, Richard Rogers. Centre Pompidou, facade elevation [competition entry 1971]

17:56// Remember to believe in yourself. 

(Source: ethel-baraona)


YMBA - Microfactory | Harry Wei + Han Dong

YMBA - Microfactory Harry Wei + Han Dong

(Source: lgwham, via euphues)

If you love something that somebody does—some art, some words, some sounds—you tell them that you love it. You tell everyone how much you love it, repeatedly and enthusiastically. Don’t save your appreciation for later, or worry about wearing people out with your passion. Because the happy truth is this: If a piece of art truly moves you, you will never, ever run out of new adjectives to express how much you love it. Getting to love someone’s art is one of the very finest parts of being alive.

artmesohard:

Many cancer patients can be overwhelmed with the physical and emotional difficulties of their disease, and the loss of their hair from chemotherapy treatment certainly doesn’t help. Henna Heals, a rich community of nearly 150 henna tattoo artists worldwide established by a team of 5 women in Canada, helps women with cancer feel confident and beautiful again by drawing elegant henna crowns on their bare heads:

The intricate patterns that the artists create with all-natural henna paste are a unique and empowering substitute to the hats and wigs that many women use to cover their heads after losing their hair to chemotherapy. “For cancer patients, the henna crowns really are a healing experience,” claims Frances Darwin, the founder of Henna Heals. “This is all about them reclaiming a part of themselves that would normally be perceived as ill or damaged or not nice to look at and making it more feminine and beautiful.”

The traditional South-Asian temporary tattoos, which are made with 100% natural home-made henna paste, last for around two weeks and have no harmful side-effects. Henna Heals also offers henna services for special events and does belly painting for mother-to-be, but they always donate 10% of their proceeds to compensate the cost of the henna crowns they make for cancer patients.

(via workman)